physfs.h
author Ryan C. Gordon <icculus@icculus.org>
Sun, 26 Sep 2004 00:25:04 +0000
changeset 648 5c993684b8f2
parent 646 86be93f03eb7
child 650 298b8bb26775
permissions -rw-r--r--
Cleaned up archiver interface to not deal with DirHandles anymore, which simplifies things, removes some responsibility and code duplication from the archivers, and trims some malloc pressure. Also ripped up the allocation hook code a little. We'll try to screw with memory locking later, since it makes everything ugly and complex. Oh well.

/** \file physfs.h */

/**
 * \mainpage PhysicsFS
 *
 * The latest version of PhysicsFS can be found at:
 *     http://icculus.org/physfs/
 *
 * PhysicsFS; a portable, flexible file i/o abstraction.
 *
 * This API gives you access to a system file system in ways superior to the
 *  stdio or system i/o calls. The brief benefits:
 *
 *   - It's portable.
 *   - It's safe. No file access is permitted outside the specified dirs.
 *   - It's flexible. Archives (.ZIP files) can be used transparently as
 *      directory structures.
 *
 * This system is largely inspired by Quake 3's PK3 files and the related
 *  fs_* cvars. If you've ever tinkered with these, then this API will be
 *  familiar to you.
 *
 * With PhysicsFS, you have a single writing directory and multiple
 *  directories (the "search path") for reading. You can think of this as a
 *  filesystem within a filesystem. If (on Windows) you were to set the
 *  writing directory to "C:\MyGame\MyWritingDirectory", then no PHYSFS calls
 *  could touch anything above this directory, including the "C:\MyGame" and
 *  "C:\" directories. This prevents an application's internal scripting
 *  language from piddling over c:\\config.sys, for example. If you'd rather
 *  give PHYSFS full access to the system's REAL file system, set the writing
 *  dir to "C:\", but that's generally A Bad Thing for several reasons.
 *
 * Drive letters are hidden in PhysicsFS once you set up your initial paths.
 *  The search path creates a single, hierarchical directory structure.
 *  Not only does this lend itself well to general abstraction with archives,
 *  it also gives better support to operating systems like MacOS and Unix.
 *  Generally speaking, you shouldn't ever hardcode a drive letter; not only
 *  does this hurt portability to non-Microsoft OSes, but it limits your win32
 *  users to a single drive, too. Use the PhysicsFS abstraction functions and
 *  allow user-defined configuration options, too. When opening a file, you
 *  specify it like it was on a Unix filesystem: if you want to write to
 *  "C:\MyGame\MyConfigFiles\game.cfg", then you might set the write dir to
 *  "C:\MyGame" and then open "MyConfigFiles/game.cfg". This gives an
 *  abstraction across all platforms. Specifying a file in this way is termed
 *  "platform-independent notation" in this documentation. Specifying a
 *  a filename in a form such as "C:\mydir\myfile" or
 *  "MacOS hard drive:My Directory:My File" is termed "platform-dependent
 *  notation". The only time you use platform-dependent notation is when
 *  setting up your write directory and search path; after that, all file
 *  access into those directories are done with platform-independent notation.
 *
 * All files opened for writing are opened in relation to the write directory,
 *  which is the root of the writable filesystem. When opening a file for
 *  reading, PhysicsFS goes through the search path. This is NOT the
 *  same thing as the PATH environment variable. An application using
 *  PhysicsFS specifies directories to be searched which may be actual
 *  directories, or archive files that contain files and subdirectories of
 *  their own. See the end of these docs for currently supported archive
 *  formats.
 *
 * Once the search path is defined, you may open files for reading. If you've
 *  got the following search path defined (to use a win32 example again):
 *
 *  - C:\\mygame
 *  - C:\\mygame\\myuserfiles
 *  - D:\\mygamescdromdatafiles
 *  - C:\\mygame\\installeddatafiles.zip
 *
 * Then a call to PHYSFS_openRead("textfiles/myfile.txt") (note the directory
 *  separator, lack of drive letter, and lack of dir separator at the start of
 *  the string; this is platform-independent notation) will check for
 *  C:\\mygame\\textfiles\\myfile.txt, then
 *  C:\\mygame\\myuserfiles\\textfiles\\myfile.txt, then
 *  D:\\mygamescdromdatafiles\\textfiles\\myfile.txt, then, finally, for
 *  textfiles\\myfile.txt inside of C:\\mygame\\installeddatafiles.zip.
 *  Remember that most archive types and platform filesystems store their
 *  filenames in a case-sensitive manner, so you should be careful to specify
 *  it correctly.
 *
 * Files opened through PhysicsFS may NOT contain "." or ".." or ":" as dir
 *  elements. Not only are these meaningless on MacOS and/or Unix, they are a
 *  security hole. Also, symbolic links (which can be found in some archive
 *  types and directly in the filesystem on Unix platforms) are NOT followed
 *  until you call PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(). That's left to your own
 *  discretion, as following a symlink can allow for access outside the write
 *  dir and search paths. There is no mechanism for creating new symlinks in
 *  PhysicsFS.
 *
 * The write dir is not included in the search path unless you specifically
 *  add it. While you CAN change the write dir as many times as you like,
 *  you should probably set it once and stick to it. Remember that your
 *  program will not have permission to write in every directory on Unix and
 *  NT systems.
 *
 * All files are opened in binary mode; there is no endline conversion for
 *  textfiles. Other than that, PhysicsFS has some convenience functions for
 *  platform-independence. There is a function to tell you the current
 *  platform's dir separator ("\\" on windows, "/" on Unix, ":" on MacOS),
 *  which is needed only to set up your search/write paths. There is a
 *  function to tell you what CD-ROM drives contain accessible discs, and a
 *  function to recommend a good search path, etc.
 *
 * A recommended order for the search path is the write dir, then the base dir,
 *  then the cdrom dir, then any archives discovered. Quake 3 does something
 *  like this, but moves the archives to the start of the search path. Build
 *  Engine games, like Duke Nukem 3D and Blood, place the archives last, and
 *  use the base dir for both searching and writing. There is a helper
 *  function (PHYSFS_setSaneConfig()) that puts together a basic configuration
 *  for you, based on a few parameters. Also see the comments on
 *  PHYSFS_getBaseDir(), and PHYSFS_getUserDir() for info on what those
 *  are and how they can help you determine an optimal search path.
 *
 * PhysicsFS is mostly thread safe. The error messages returned by
 *  PHYSFS_getLastError are unique by thread, and library-state-setting
 *  functions are mutex'd. For efficiency, individual file accesses are 
 *  not locked, so you can not safely read/write/seek/close/etc the same 
 *  file from two threads at the same time. Other race conditions are bugs 
 *  that should be reported/patched.
 *
 * While you CAN use stdio/syscall file access in a program that has PHYSFS_*
 *  calls, doing so is not recommended, and you can not use system
 *  filehandles with PhysicsFS and vice versa.
 *
 * Note that archives need not be named as such: if you have a ZIP file and
 *  rename it with a .PKG extension, the file will still be recognized as a
 *  ZIP archive by PhysicsFS; the file's contents are used to determine its
 *  type.
 *
 * Currently supported archive types:
 *   - .ZIP (pkZip/WinZip/Info-ZIP compatible)
 *   - .GRP (Build Engine groupfile archives)
 *   - .PAK (Quake I/II archive format)
 *   - .HOG (Descent I/II HOG file archives)
 *   - .MVL (Descent II movielib archives)
 *   - .WAD (DOOM engine archives)
 *
 * Please see the file LICENSE in the source's root directory for licensing
 *  and redistribution rights.
 *
 * Please see the file CREDITS in the source's root directory for a complete
 *  list of who's responsible for this.
 *
 *  \author Ryan C. Gordon.
 */

#ifndef _INCLUDE_PHYSFS_H_
#define _INCLUDE_PHYSFS_H_

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

#ifndef DOXYGEN_SHOULD_IGNORE_THIS
#if (defined _MSC_VER)
#define __EXPORT__ __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define __EXPORT__
#endif
#endif  /* DOXYGEN_SHOULD_IGNORE_THIS */

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_uint8
 * \brief An unsigned, 8-bit integer type.
 */
typedef unsigned char         PHYSFS_uint8;

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_sint8
 * \brief A signed, 8-bit integer type.
 */
typedef signed char           PHYSFS_sint8;

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_uint16
 * \brief An unsigned, 16-bit integer type.
 */
typedef unsigned short        PHYSFS_uint16;

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_sint16
 * \brief A signed, 16-bit integer type.
 */
typedef signed short          PHYSFS_sint16;

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_uint32
 * \brief An unsigned, 32-bit integer type.
 */
typedef unsigned int          PHYSFS_uint32;

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_sint32
 * \brief A signed, 32-bit integer type.
 */
typedef signed int            PHYSFS_sint32;

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_uint64
 * \brief An unsigned, 64-bit integer type.
 * \warning on platforms without any sort of 64-bit datatype, this is
 *           equivalent to PHYSFS_uint32!
 */

/**
 * \typedef PHYSFS_sint64
 * \brief A signed, 64-bit integer type.
 * \warning on platforms without any sort of 64-bit datatype, this is
 *           equivalent to PHYSFS_sint32!
 */


#if (defined PHYSFS_NO_64BIT_SUPPORT)  /* oh well. */
typedef PHYSFS_uint32         PHYSFS_uint64;
typedef PHYSFS_sint32         PHYSFS_sint64;
#elif (defined _MSC_VER)
typedef signed __int64        PHYSFS_sint64;
typedef unsigned __int64      PHYSFS_uint64;
#else
typedef unsigned long long    PHYSFS_uint64;
typedef signed long long      PHYSFS_sint64;
#endif


#ifndef DOXYGEN_SHOULD_IGNORE_THIS
/* Make sure the types really have the right sizes */
#define PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(name, x)               \
       typedef int PHYSFS_dummy_ ## name[(x) * 2 - 1]

PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(uint8, sizeof(PHYSFS_uint8) == 1);
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(sint8, sizeof(PHYSFS_sint8) == 1);
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(uint16, sizeof(PHYSFS_uint16) == 2);
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(sint16, sizeof(PHYSFS_sint16) == 2);
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(uint32, sizeof(PHYSFS_uint32) == 4);
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(sint32, sizeof(PHYSFS_sint32) == 4);

#ifndef PHYSFS_NO_64BIT_SUPPORT
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(uint64, sizeof(PHYSFS_uint64) == 8);
PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT(sint64, sizeof(PHYSFS_sint64) == 8);
#endif

#undef PHYSFS_COMPILE_TIME_ASSERT

#endif  /* DOXYGEN_SHOULD_IGNORE_THIS */


/**
 * \struct PHYSFS_file
 * \brief A PhysicsFS file handle.
 *
 * You get a pointer to one of these when you open a file for reading,
 *  writing, or appending via PhysicsFS.
 *
 * As you can see from the lack of meaningful fields, you should treat this
 *  as opaque data. Don't try to manipulate the file handle, just pass the
 *  pointer you got, unmolested, to various PhysicsFS APIs.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_openRead
 * \sa PHYSFS_openWrite
 * \sa PHYSFS_openAppend
 * \sa PHYSFS_close
 * \sa PHYSFS_read
 * \sa PHYSFS_write
 * \sa PHYSFS_seek
 * \sa PHYSFS_tell
 * \sa PHYSFS_eof
 * \sa PHYSFS_setBuffer
 * \sa PHYSFS_flush
 */
typedef struct
{
    void *opaque;  /**< That's all you get. Don't touch. */
} PHYSFS_file;



/**
 * \struct PHYSFS_ArchiveInfo
 * \brief Information on various PhysicsFS-supported archives.
 *
 * This structure gives you details on what sort of archives are supported
 *  by this implementation of PhysicsFS. Archives tend to be things like
 *  ZIP files and such.
 *
 * \warning Not all binaries are created equal! PhysicsFS can be built with
 *          or without support for various archives. You can check with
 *          PHYSFS_supportedArchiveTypes() to see if your archive type is
 *          supported.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_supportedArchiveTypes
 */
typedef struct
{
    const char *extension;   /**< Archive file extension: "ZIP", for example. */
    const char *description; /**< Human-readable archive description. */
    const char *author;      /**< Person who did support for this archive. */
    const char *url;         /**< URL related to this archive */
} PHYSFS_ArchiveInfo;


/**
 * \struct PHYSFS_Version
 * \brief Information the version of PhysicsFS in use.
 *
 * Represents the library's version as three levels: major revision
 *  (increments with massive changes, additions, and enhancements),
 *  minor revision (increments with backwards-compatible changes to the
 *  major revision), and patchlevel (increments with fixes to the minor
 *  revision).
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_VERSION
 * \sa PHYFS_getLinkedVersion
 */
typedef struct
{
    PHYSFS_uint8 major; /**< major revision */
    PHYSFS_uint8 minor; /**< minor revision */
    PHYSFS_uint8 patch; /**< patchlevel */
} PHYSFS_Version;

#ifndef DOXYGEN_SHOULD_IGNORE_THIS
#define PHYSFS_VER_MAJOR 1
#define PHYSFS_VER_MINOR 0
#define PHYSFS_VER_PATCH 0
#endif  /* DOXYGEN_SHOULD_IGNORE_THIS */


/* PhysicsFS state stuff ... */

/**
 * \def PHYSFS_VERSION(x)
 * \brief Macro to determine PhysicsFS version program was compiled against.
 *
 * This macro fills in a PHYSFS_Version structure with the version of the
 *  library you compiled against. This is determined by what header the
 *  compiler uses. Note that if you dynamically linked the library, you might
 *  have a slightly newer or older version at runtime. That version can be
 *  determined with PHYSFS_getLinkedVersion(), which, unlike PHYSFS_VERSION,
 *  is not a macro.
 *
 * \param x A pointer to a PHYSFS_Version struct to initialize.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_Version
 * \sa PHYSFS_getLinkedVersion
 */
#define PHYSFS_VERSION(x) \
{ \
    (x)->major = PHYSFS_VER_MAJOR; \
    (x)->minor = PHYSFS_VER_MINOR; \
    (x)->patch = PHYSFS_VER_PATCH; \
}


/**
 * \fn void PHYSFS_getLinkedVersion(PHYSFS_Version *ver)
 * \brief Get the version of PhysicsFS that is linked against your program.
 *
 * If you are using a shared library (DLL) version of PhysFS, then it is
 *  possible that it will be different than the version you compiled against.
 *
 * This is a real function; the macro PHYSFS_VERSION tells you what version
 *  of PhysFS you compiled against:
 *
 * \code
 * PHYSFS_Version compiled;
 * PHYSFS_Version linked;
 *
 * PHYSFS_VERSION(&compiled);
 * PHYSFS_getLinkedVersion(&linked);
 * printf("We compiled against PhysFS version %d.%d.%d ...\n",
 *           compiled.major, compiled.minor, compiled.patch);
 * printf("But we linked against PhysFS version %d.%d.%d.\n",
 *           linked.major, linked.minor, linked.patch);
 * \endcode
 *
 * This function may be called safely at any time, even before PHYSFS_init().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_VERSION
 */
__EXPORT__ void PHYSFS_getLinkedVersion(PHYSFS_Version *ver);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_init(const char *argv0)
 * \brief Initialize the PhysicsFS library.
 *
 * This must be called before any other PhysicsFS function.
 *
 * This should be called prior to any attempts to change your process's
 *  current working directory.
 *
 *   \param argv0 the argv[0] string passed to your program's mainline.
 *          This may be NULL on most platforms (such as ones without a
 *          standard main() function), but you should always try to pass
 *          something in here. Unix-like systems such as Linux _need_ to
 *          pass argv[0] from main() in here.
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_deinit
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_init(const char *argv0);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_deinit(void)
 * \brief Deinitialize the PhysicsFS library.
 *
 * This closes any files opened via PhysicsFS, blanks the search/write paths,
 *  frees memory, and invalidates all of your file handles.
 *
 * Note that this call can FAIL if there's a file open for writing that
 *  refuses to close (for example, the underlying operating system was
 *  buffering writes to network filesystem, and the fileserver has crashed,
 *  or a hard drive has failed, etc). It is usually best to close all write
 *  handles yourself before calling this function, so that you can gracefully
 *  handle a specific failure.
 *
 * Once successfully deinitialized, PHYSFS_init() can be called again to
 *  restart the subsystem. All defaults API states are restored at this
 *  point.
 *
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError(). If failure, state of PhysFS is
 *          undefined, and probably badly screwed up.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_init
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_deinit(void);


/**
 * \fn const PHYSFS_ArchiveInfo **PHYSFS_supportedArchiveTypes(void)
 * \brief Get a list of supported archive types.
 *
 * Get a list of archive types supported by this implementation of PhysicFS.
 *  These are the file formats usable for search path entries. This is for
 *  informational purposes only. Note that the extension listed is merely
 *  convention: if we list "ZIP", you can open a PkZip-compatible archive
 *  with an extension of "XYZ", if you like.
 *
 * The returned value is an array of pointers to PHYSFS_ArchiveInfo structures,
 *  with a NULL entry to signify the end of the list:
 *
 * \code
 * PHYSFS_ArchiveInfo **i;
 *
 * for (i = PHYSFS_supportedArchiveTypes(); *i != NULL; i++)
 * {
 *     printf("Supported archive: [%s], which is [%s].\n",
 *              i->extension, i->description);
 * }
 * \endcode
 *
 * The return values are pointers to static internal memory, and should
 *  be considered READ ONLY, and never freed.
 *
 *   \return READ ONLY Null-terminated array of READ ONLY structures.
 */
__EXPORT__ const PHYSFS_ArchiveInfo **PHYSFS_supportedArchiveTypes(void);


/**
 * \fn void PHYSFS_freeList(void *listVar)
 * \brief Deallocate resources of lists returned by PhysicsFS.
 *
 * Certain PhysicsFS functions return lists of information that are
 *  dynamically allocated. Use this function to free those resources.
 *
 *   \param listVar List of information specified as freeable by this function.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_getCdRomDirs
 * \sa PHYSFS_enumerateFiles
 * \sa PHYSFS_getSearchPath
 */
__EXPORT__ void PHYSFS_freeList(void *listVar);


/**
 * \fn const char *PHYSFS_getLastError(void)
 * \brief Get human-readable error information.
 *
 * Get the last PhysicsFS error message as a null-terminated string.
 *  This will be NULL if there's been no error since the last call to this
 *  function. The pointer returned by this call points to an internal buffer.
 *  Each thread has a unique error state associated with it, but each time
 *  a new error message is set, it will overwrite the previous one associated
 *  with that thread. It is safe to call this function at anytime, even
 *  before PHYSFS_init().
 *
 *   \return READ ONLY string of last error message.
 */
__EXPORT__ const char *PHYSFS_getLastError(void);


/**
 * \fn const char *PHYSFS_getDirSeparator(void)
 * \brief Get platform-dependent dir separator string.
 *
 * This returns "\\\\" on win32, "/" on Unix, and ":" on MacOS. It may be more
 *  than one character, depending on the platform, and your code should take
 *  that into account. Note that this is only useful for setting up the
 *  search/write paths, since access into those dirs always use '/'
 *  (platform-independent notation) to separate directories. This is also
 *  handy for getting platform-independent access when using stdio calls.
 *
 *   \return READ ONLY null-terminated string of platform's dir separator.
 */
__EXPORT__ const char *PHYSFS_getDirSeparator(void);


/**
 * \fn void PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(int allow)
 * \brief Enable or disable following of symbolic links.
 *
 * Some physical filesystems and archives contain files that are just pointers
 *  to other files. On the physical filesystem, opening such a link will
 *  (transparently) open the file that is pointed to.
 *
 * By default, PhysicsFS will check if a file is really a symlink during open
 *  calls and fail if it is. Otherwise, the link could take you outside the
 *  write and search paths, and compromise security.
 *
 * If you want to take that risk, call this function with a non-zero parameter.
 *  Note that this is more for sandboxing a program's scripting language, in
 *  case untrusted scripts try to compromise the system. Generally speaking,
 *  a user could very well have a legitimate reason to set up a symlink, so
 *  unless you feel there's a specific danger in allowing them, you should
 *  permit them.
 *
 * Symlinks are only explicitly checked when dealing with filenames
 *  in platform-independent notation. That is, when setting up your
 *  search and write paths, etc, symlinks are never checked for.
 *
 * Symbolic link permission can be enabled or disabled at any time after
 *  you've called PHYSFS_init(), and is disabled by default.
 *
 *   \param allow nonzero to permit symlinks, zero to deny linking.
 */
__EXPORT__ void PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(int allow);


/**
 * \fn char **PHYSFS_getCdRomDirs(void)
 * \brief Get an array of paths to available CD-ROM drives.
 *
 * The dirs returned are platform-dependent ("D:\" on Win32, "/cdrom" or
 *  whatnot on Unix). Dirs are only returned if there is a disc ready and
 *  accessible in the drive. So if you've got two drives (D: and E:), and only
 *  E: has a disc in it, then that's all you get. If the user inserts a disc
 *  in D: and you call this function again, you get both drives. If, on a
 *  Unix box, the user unmounts a disc and remounts it elsewhere, the next
 *  call to this function will reflect that change. Fun.
 *
 * The returned value is an array of strings, with a NULL entry to signify the
 *  end of the list:
 *
 * \code
 * char **cds = PHYSFS_getCdRomDirs();
 * char **i;
 *
 * for (i = cds; *i != NULL; i++)
 *     printf("cdrom dir [%s] is available.\n", *i);
 *
 * PHYSFS_freeList(cds);
 * \endcode
 *
 * This call may block while drives spin up. Be forewarned.
 *
 * When you are done with the returned information, you may dispose of the
 *  resources by calling PHYSFS_freeList() with the returned pointer.
 *
 *   \return Null-terminated array of null-terminated strings.
 */
__EXPORT__ char **PHYSFS_getCdRomDirs(void);


/**
 * \fn const char *PHYSFS_getBaseDir(void)
 * \brief Get the path where the application resides.
 *
 * Helper function.
 *
 * Get the "base dir". This is the directory where the application was run
 *  from, which is probably the installation directory, and may or may not
 *  be the process's current working directory.
 *
 * You should probably use the base dir in your search path.
 *
 *  \return READ ONLY string of base dir in platform-dependent notation.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_getUserDir
 */
__EXPORT__ const char *PHYSFS_getBaseDir(void);


/**
 * \fn const char *PHYSFS_getUserDir(void)
 * \brief Get the path where user's home directory resides.
 *
 * Helper function.
 *
 * Get the "user dir". This is meant to be a suggestion of where a specific
 *  user of the system can store files. On Unix, this is her home directory.
 *  On systems with no concept of multiple home directories (MacOS, win95),
 *  this will default to something like "C:\mybasedir\users\username"
 *  where "username" will either be the login name, or "default" if the
 *  platform doesn't support multiple users, either.
 *
 * You should probably use the user dir as the basis for your write dir, and
 *  also put it near the beginning of your search path.
 *
 *  \return READ ONLY string of user dir in platform-dependent notation.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_getBaseDir
 */
__EXPORT__ const char *PHYSFS_getUserDir(void);


/**
 * \fn const char *PHYSFS_getWriteDir(void)
 * \brief Get path where PhysicsFS will allow file writing.
 *
 * Get the current write dir. The default write dir is NULL.
 *
 *  \return READ ONLY string of write dir in platform-dependent notation,
 *           OR NULL IF NO WRITE PATH IS CURRENTLY SET.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_setWriteDir
 */
__EXPORT__ const char *PHYSFS_getWriteDir(void);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_setWriteDir(const char *newDir)
 * \brief Tell PhysicsFS where it may write files.
 *
 * Set a new write dir. This will override the previous setting. If the
 *  directory or a parent directory doesn't exist in the physical filesystem,
 *  PhysicsFS will attempt to create them as needed.
 *
 * This call will fail (and fail to change the write dir) if the current
 *  write dir still has files open in it.
 *
 *   \param newDir The new directory to be the root of the write dir,
 *                   specified in platform-dependent notation. Setting to NULL
 *                   disables the write dir, so no files can be opened for
 *                   writing via PhysicsFS.
 *  \return non-zero on success, zero on failure. All attempts to open a file
 *           for writing via PhysicsFS will fail until this call succeeds.
 *           Specifics of the error can be gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_getWriteDir
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_setWriteDir(const char *newDir);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_addToSearchPath(const char *newDir, int appendToPath)
 * \brief Add an archive or directory to the search path.
 *
 * If this is a duplicate, the entry is not added again, even though the
 *  function succeeds.
 *
 *   \param newDir directory or archive to add to the path, in
 *                   platform-dependent notation.
 *   \param appendToPath nonzero to append to search path, zero to prepend.
 *  \return nonzero if added to path, zero on failure (bogus archive, dir
 *                   missing, etc). Specifics of the error can be
 *                   gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_removeFromSearchPath
 * \sa PHYSFS_getSearchPath
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_addToSearchPath(const char *newDir, int appendToPath);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_removeFromSearchPath(const char *oldDir)
 * \brief Remove a directory or archive from the search path.
 *
 * This must be a (case-sensitive) match to a dir or archive already in the
 *  search path, specified in platform-dependent notation.
 *
 * This call will fail (and fail to remove from the path) if the element still
 *  has files open in it.
 *
 *    \param oldDir dir/archive to remove.
 *   \return nonzero on success, zero on failure.
 *            Specifics of the error can be gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_addToSearchPath
 * \sa PHYSFS_getSearchPath
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_removeFromSearchPath(const char *oldDir);


/**
 * \fn char **PHYSFS_getSearchPath(void)
 * \brief Get the current search path.
 *
 * The default search path is an empty list.
 *
 * The returned value is an array of strings, with a NULL entry to signify the
 *  end of the list:
 *
 * \code
 * char **i;
 *
 * for (i = PHYSFS_getSearchPath(); *i != NULL; i++)
 *     printf("[%s] is in the search path.\n", *i);
 * \endcode
 *
 * When you are done with the returned information, you may dispose of the
 *  resources by calling PHYSFS_freeList() with the returned pointer.
 *
 *   \return Null-terminated array of null-terminated strings. NULL if there
 *            was a problem (read: OUT OF MEMORY).
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_addToSearchPath
 * \sa PHYSFS_removeFromSearchPath
 */
__EXPORT__ char **PHYSFS_getSearchPath(void);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_setSaneConfig(const char *organization, const char *appName, const char *archiveExt, int includeCdRoms, int archivesFirst)
 * \brief Set up sane, default paths.
 *
 * Helper function.
 *
 * The write dir will be set to "userdir/.organization/appName", which is
 *  created if it doesn't exist.
 *
 * The above is sufficient to make sure your program's configuration directory
 *  is separated from other clutter, and platform-independent. The period
 *  before "mygame" even hides the directory on Unix systems.
 *
 *  The search path will be:
 *
 *    - The Write Dir (created if it doesn't exist)
 *    - The Base Dir (PHYSFS_getBaseDir())
 *    - All found CD-ROM dirs (optionally)
 *
 * These directories are then searched for files ending with the extension
 *  (archiveExt), which, if they are valid and supported archives, will also
 *  be added to the search path. If you specified "PKG" for (archiveExt), and
 *  there's a file named data.PKG in the base dir, it'll be checked. Archives
 *  can either be appended or prepended to the search path in alphabetical
 *  order, regardless of which directories they were found in.
 *
 * All of this can be accomplished from the application, but this just does it
 *  all for you. Feel free to add more to the search path manually, too.
 *
 *    \param organization Name of your company/group/etc to be used as a
 *                         dirname, so keep it small, and no-frills.
 *
 *    \param appName Program-specific name of your program, to separate it
 *                   from other programs using PhysicsFS.
 *
 *    \param archiveExt File extension used by your program to specify an
 *                      archive. For example, Quake 3 uses "pk3", even though
 *                      they are just zipfiles. Specify NULL to not dig out
 *                      archives automatically. Do not specify the '.' char;
 *                      If you want to look for ZIP files, specify "ZIP" and
 *                      not ".ZIP" ... the archive search is case-insensitive.
 *
 *    \param includeCdRoms Non-zero to include CD-ROMs in the search path, and
 *                         (if (archiveExt) != NULL) search them for archives.
 *                         This may cause a significant amount of blocking
 *                         while discs are accessed, and if there are no discs
 *                         in the drive (or even not mounted on Unix systems),
 *                         then they may not be made available anyhow. You may
 *                         want to specify zero and handle the disc setup
 *                         yourself.
 *
 *    \param archivesFirst Non-zero to prepend the archives to the search path.
 *                          Zero to append them. Ignored if !(archiveExt).
 *
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_setSaneConfig(const char *organization,
                                    const char *appName,
                                    const char *archiveExt,
                                    int includeCdRoms,
                                    int archivesFirst);


/* Directory management stuff ... */

/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_mkdir(const char *dirName)
 * \brief Create a directory.
 *
 * This is specified in platform-independent notation in relation to the
 *  write dir. All missing parent directories are also created if they
 *  don't exist.
 *
 * So if you've got the write dir set to "C:\mygame\writedir" and call
 *  PHYSFS_mkdir("downloads/maps") then the directories
 *  "C:\mygame\writedir\downloads" and "C:\mygame\writedir\downloads\maps"
 *  will be created if possible. If the creation of "maps" fails after we
 *  have successfully created "downloads", then the function leaves the
 *  created directory behind and reports failure.
 *
 *   \param dirName New dir to create.
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_delete
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_mkdir(const char *dirName);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_delete(const char *filename)
 * \brief Delete a file or directory.
 *
 * (filename) is specified in platform-independent notation in relation to the
 *  write dir.
 *
 * A directory must be empty before this call can delete it.
 *
 * Deleting a symlink will remove the link, not what it points to, regardless
 *  of whether you "permitSymLinks" or not.
 *
 * So if you've got the write dir set to "C:\mygame\writedir" and call
 *  PHYSFS_delete("downloads/maps/level1.map") then the file
 *  "C:\mygame\writedir\downloads\maps\level1.map" is removed from the
 *  physical filesystem, if it exists and the operating system permits the
 *  deletion.
 *
 * Note that on Unix systems, deleting a file may be successful, but the
 *  actual file won't be removed until all processes that have an open
 *  filehandle to it (including your program) close their handles.
 *
 * Chances are, the bits that make up the file still exist, they are just
 *  made available to be written over at a later point. Don't consider this
 *  a security method or anything.  :)
 *
 *   \param filename Filename to delete.
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_delete(const char *filename);


/**
 * \fn const char *PHYSFS_getRealDir(const char *filename)
 * \brief Figure out where in the search path a file resides.
 *
 * The file is specified in platform-independent notation. The returned
 *  filename will be the element of the search path where the file was found,
 *  which may be a directory, or an archive. Even if there are multiple
 *  matches in different parts of the search path, only the first one found
 *  is used, just like when opening a file.
 *
 * So, if you look for "maps/level1.map", and C:\\mygame is in your search
 *  path and C:\\mygame\\maps\\level1.map exists, then "C:\mygame" is returned.
 *
 * If a any part of a match is a symbolic link, and you've not explicitly
 *  permitted symlinks, then it will be ignored, and the search for a match
 *  will continue.
 *
 *     \param filename file to look for.
 *    \return READ ONLY string of element of search path containing the
 *             the file in question. NULL if not found.
 */
__EXPORT__ const char *PHYSFS_getRealDir(const char *filename);


/**
 * \fn char **PHYSFS_enumerateFiles(const char *dir)
 * \brief Get a file listing of a search path's directory.
 *
 * Matching directories are interpolated. That is, if "C:\mydir" is in the
 *  search path and contains a directory "savegames" that contains "x.sav",
 *  "y.sav", and "z.sav", and there is also a "C:\userdir" in the search path
 *  that has a "savegames" subdirectory with "w.sav", then the following code:
 *
 * \code
 * char **rc = PHYSFS_enumerateFiles("savegames");
 * char **i;
 *
 * for (i = rc; *i != NULL; i++)
 *     printf(" * We've got [%s].\n", *i);
 *
 * PHYSFS_freeList(rc);
 * \endcode
 *
 *  ...will print:
 *
 * \verbatim
 * We've got [x.sav].
 * We've got [y.sav].
 * We've got [z.sav].
 * We've got [w.sav].\endverbatim
 *
 * Feel free to sort the list however you like. We only promise there will
 *  be no duplicates, but not what order the final list will come back in.
 *
 * Don't forget to call PHYSFS_freeList() with the return value from this
 *  function when you are done with it.
 *
 *    \param dir directory in platform-independent notation to enumerate.
 *   \return Null-terminated array of null-terminated strings.
 */
__EXPORT__ char **PHYSFS_enumerateFiles(const char *dir);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_exists(const char *fname)
 * \brief Determine if a file exists in the search path.
 *
 * Reports true if there is an entry anywhere in the search path by the
 *  name of (fname).
 *
 * Note that entries that are symlinks are ignored if
 *  PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(1) hasn't been called, so you
 *  might end up further down in the search path than expected.
 *
 *    \param fname filename in platform-independent notation.
 *   \return non-zero if filename exists. zero otherwise.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_isDirectory
 * \sa PHYSFS_isSymbolicLink
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_exists(const char *fname);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_isDirectory(const char *fname)
 * \brief Determine if a file in the search path is really a directory.
 *
 * Determine if the first occurence of (fname) in the search path is
 *  really a directory entry.
 *
 * Note that entries that are symlinks are ignored if
 *  PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(1) hasn't been called, so you
 *  might end up further down in the search path than expected.
 *
 *    \param fname filename in platform-independent notation.
 *   \return non-zero if filename exists and is a directory.  zero otherwise.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_exists
 * \sa PHYSFS_isSymbolicLink
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_isDirectory(const char *fname);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_isSymbolicLink(const char *fname)
 * \brief Determine if a file in the search path is really a symbolic link.
 *
 * Determine if the first occurence of (fname) in the search path is
 *  really a symbolic link.
 *
 * Note that entries that are symlinks are ignored if
 *  PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(1) hasn't been called, and as such,
 *  this function will always return 0 in that case.
 *
 *    \param fname filename in platform-independent notation.
 *   \return non-zero if filename exists and is a symlink.  zero otherwise.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_exists
 * \sa PHYSFS_isDirectory
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_isSymbolicLink(const char *fname);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_getLastModTime(const char *filename)
 * \brief Get the last modification time of a file.
 *
 * The modtime is returned as a number of seconds since the epoch
 *  (Jan 1, 1970). The exact derivation and accuracy of this time depends on
 *  the particular archiver. If there is no reasonable way to obtain this
 *  information for a particular archiver, or there was some sort of error,
 *  this function returns (-1).
 *
 *   \param filename filename to check, in platform-independent notation.
 *  \return last modified time of the file. -1 if it can't be determined.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_getLastModTime(const char *filename);


/* i/o stuff... */

/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_file *PHYSFS_openWrite(const char *filename)
 * \brief Open a file for writing.
 *
 * Open a file for writing, in platform-independent notation and in relation
 *  to the write dir as the root of the writable filesystem. The specified
 *  file is created if it doesn't exist. If it does exist, it is truncated to
 *  zero bytes, and the writing offset is set to the start.
 *
 * Note that entries that are symlinks are ignored if
 *  PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(1) hasn't been called, and opening a
 *  symlink with this function will fail in such a case.
 *
 *   \param filename File to open.
 *  \return A valid PhysicsFS filehandle on success, NULL on error. Specifics
 *           of the error can be gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_openRead
 * \sa PHYSFS_openAppend
 * \sa PHYSFS_write
 * \sa PHYSFS_close
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_file *PHYSFS_openWrite(const char *filename);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_file *PHYSFS_openAppend(const char *filename)
 * \brief Open a file for appending.
 *
 * Open a file for writing, in platform-independent notation and in relation
 *  to the write dir as the root of the writable filesystem. The specified
 *  file is created if it doesn't exist. If it does exist, the writing offset
 *  is set to the end of the file, so the first write will be the byte after
 *  the end.
 *
 * Note that entries that are symlinks are ignored if
 *  PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(1) hasn't been called, and opening a
 *  symlink with this function will fail in such a case.
 *
 *   \param filename File to open.
 *  \return A valid PhysicsFS filehandle on success, NULL on error. Specifics
 *           of the error can be gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_openRead
 * \sa PHYSFS_openWrite
 * \sa PHYSFS_write
 * \sa PHYSFS_close
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_file *PHYSFS_openAppend(const char *filename);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_file *PHYSFS_openRead(const char *filename)
 * \brief Open a file for reading.
 *
 * Open a file for reading, in platform-independent notation. The search path
 *  is checked one at a time until a matching file is found, in which case an
 *  abstract filehandle is associated with it, and reading may be done.
 *  The reading offset is set to the first byte of the file.
 *
 * Note that entries that are symlinks are ignored if
 *  PHYSFS_permitSymbolicLinks(1) hasn't been called, and opening a
 *  symlink with this function will fail in such a case.
 *
 *   \param filename File to open.
 *  \return A valid PhysicsFS filehandle on success, NULL on error. Specifics
 *           of the error can be gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_openWrite
 * \sa PHYSFS_openAppend
 * \sa PHYSFS_read
 * \sa PHYSFS_close
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_file *PHYSFS_openRead(const char *filename);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_close(PHYSFS_file *handle)
 * \brief Close a PhysicsFS filehandle.
 *
 * This call is capable of failing if the operating system was buffering
 *  writes to the physical media, and, now forced to write those changes to
 *  physical media, can not store the data for some reason. In such a case,
 *  the filehandle stays open. A well-written program should ALWAYS check the
 *  return value from the close call in addition to every writing call!
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_open*().
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_openRead
 * \sa PHYSFS_openWrite
 * \sa PHYSFS_openAppend
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_close(PHYSFS_file *handle);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_read(PHYSFS_file *handle, void *buffer, PHYSFS_uint32 objSize, PHYSFS_uint32 objCount)
 * \brief Read data from a PhysicsFS filehandle
 *
 * The file must be opened for reading.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_openRead().
 *   \param buffer buffer to store read data into.
 *   \param objSize size in bytes of objects being read from (handle).
 *   \param objCount number of (objSize) objects to read from (handle).
 *  \return number of objects read. PHYSFS_getLastError() can shed light on
 *           the reason this might be < (objCount), as can PHYSFS_eof().
 *            -1 if complete failure.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_eof
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_read(PHYSFS_file *handle,
                                     void *buffer,
                                     PHYSFS_uint32 objSize,
                                     PHYSFS_uint32 objCount);

/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_write(PHYSFS_file *handle, const void *buffer, PHYSFS_uint32 objSize, PHYSFS_uint32 objCount)
 * \brief Write data to a PhysicsFS filehandle
 *
 * The file must be opened for writing.
 *
 *   \param handle retval from PHYSFS_openWrite() or PHYSFS_openAppend().
 *   \param buffer buffer to store read data into.
 *   \param objSize size in bytes of objects being read from (handle).
 *   \param objCount number of (objSize) objects to read from (handle).
 *  \return number of objects written. PHYSFS_getLastError() can shed light on
 *           the reason this might be < (objCount). -1 if complete failure.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_write(PHYSFS_file *handle,
                                      const void *buffer,
                                      PHYSFS_uint32 objSize,
                                      PHYSFS_uint32 objCount);


/* File position stuff... */

/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_eof(PHYSFS_file *handle)
 * \brief Check for end-of-file state on a PhysicsFS filehandle.
 *
 * Determine if the end of file has been reached in a PhysicsFS filehandle.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_openRead().
 *  \return nonzero if EOF, zero if not.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_read
 * \sa PHYSFS_tell
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_eof(PHYSFS_file *handle);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_tell(PHYSFS_file *handle)
 * \brief Determine current position within a PhysicsFS filehandle.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_open*().
 *  \return offset in bytes from start of file. -1 if error occurred.
 *           Specifics of the error can be gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_seek
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_tell(PHYSFS_file *handle);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_seek(PHYSFS_file *handle, PHYSFS_uint64 pos)
 * \brief Seek to a new position within a PhysicsFS filehandle.
 *
 * The next read or write will occur at that place. Seeking past the
 *  beginning or end of the file is not allowed, and causes an error.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_open*().
 *   \param pos number of bytes from start of file to seek to.
 *  \return nonzero on success, zero on error. Specifics of the error can be
 *          gleaned from PHYSFS_getLastError().
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_tell
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_seek(PHYSFS_file *handle, PHYSFS_uint64 pos);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_fileLength(PHYSFS_file *handle)
 * \brief Get total length of a file in bytes.
 *
 * Note that if the file size can't be determined (since the archive is
 *  "streamed" or whatnot) than this will report (-1). Also note that if
 *  another process/thread is writing to this file at the same time, then
 *  the information this function supplies could be incorrect before you
 *  get it. Use with caution, or better yet, don't use at all.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_open*().
 *  \return size in bytes of the file. -1 if can't be determined.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_tell
 * \sa PHYSFS_seek
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_fileLength(PHYSFS_file *handle);


/* Buffering stuff... */

/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_setBuffer(PHYSFS_file *handle, PHYSFS_uint64 bufsize)
 * \brief Set up buffering for a PhysicsFS file handle.
 *
 * Define an i/o buffer for a file handle. A memory block of (bufsize) bytes
 *  will be allocated and associated with (handle).
 *
 * For files opened for reading, up to (bufsize) bytes are read from (handle)
 *  and stored in the internal buffer. Calls to PHYSFS_read() will pull
 *  from this buffer until it is empty, and then refill it for more reading.
 *  Note that compressed files, like ZIP archives, will decompress while
 *  buffering, so this can be handy for offsetting CPU-intensive operations.
 *  The buffer isn't filled until you do your next read.
 *
 * For files opened for writing, data will be buffered to memory until the
 *  buffer is full or the buffer is flushed. Closing a handle implicitly
 *  causes a flush...check your return values!
 *
 * Seeking, etc transparently accounts for buffering.
 *
 * You can resize an existing buffer by calling this function more than once
 *  on the same file. Setting the buffer size to zero will free an existing
 *  buffer.
 *
 * PhysicsFS file handles are unbuffered by default.
 *
 * Please check the return value of this function! Failures can include
 *  not being able to seek backwards in a read-only file when removing the
 *  buffer, not being able to allocate the buffer, and not being able to
 *  flush the buffer to disk, among other unexpected problems.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_open*().
 *   \param bufsize size, in bytes, of buffer to allocate.
 *  \return nonzero if successful, zero on error.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_flush
 * \sa PHYSFS_read
 * \sa PHYSFS_write
 * \sa PHYSFS_close
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_setBuffer(PHYSFS_file *handle, PHYSFS_uint64 bufsize);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_flush(PHYSFS_file *handle)
 * \brief Flush a buffered PhysicsFS file handle.
 *
 * For buffered files opened for writing, this will put the current contents
 *  of the buffer to disk and flag the buffer as empty if possible.
 *
 * For buffered files opened for reading or unbuffered files, this is a safe
 *  no-op, and will report success.
 *
 *   \param handle handle returned from PHYSFS_open*().
 *  \return nonzero if successful, zero on error.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_setBuffer
 * \sa PHYSFS_close
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_flush(PHYSFS_file *handle);


/* Byteorder stuff... */

/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint16 PHYSFS_swapSLE16(PHYSFS_sint16 val)
 * \brief Swap littleendian signed 16 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 16-bit signed value in littleendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint16 PHYSFS_swapSLE16(PHYSFS_sint16 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_uint16 PHYSFS_swapULE16(PHYSFS_uint16 val)
 * \brief Swap littleendian unsigned 16 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 16-bit unsigned value in littleendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_uint16 PHYSFS_swapULE16(PHYSFS_uint16 val);

/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint32 PHYSFS_swapSLE32(PHYSFS_sint32 val)
 * \brief Swap littleendian signed 32 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 32-bit signed value in littleendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint32 PHYSFS_swapSLE32(PHYSFS_sint32 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_uint32 PHYSFS_swapULE32(PHYSFS_uint32 val)
 * \brief Swap littleendian unsigned 32 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 32-bit unsigned value in littleendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_uint32 PHYSFS_swapULE32(PHYSFS_uint32 val);

/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_swapSLE64(PHYSFS_sint64 val)
 * \brief Swap littleendian signed 64 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 64-bit signed value in littleendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_swapSLE64(PHYSFS_sint64 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_uint64 PHYSFS_swapULE64(PHYSFS_uint64 val)
 * \brief Swap littleendian unsigned 64 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 64-bit unsigned value in littleendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_uint64 PHYSFS_swapULE64(PHYSFS_uint64 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint16 PHYSFS_swapSBE16(PHYSFS_sint16 val)
 * \brief Swap bigendian signed 16 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 16-bit signed value in bigendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint16 PHYSFS_swapSBE16(PHYSFS_sint16 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_uint16 PHYSFS_swapUBE16(PHYSFS_uint16 val)
 * \brief Swap bigendian unsigned 16 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 16-bit unsigned value in bigendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_uint16 PHYSFS_swapUBE16(PHYSFS_uint16 val);

/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint32 PHYSFS_swapSBE32(PHYSFS_sint32 val)
 * \brief Swap bigendian signed 32 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 32-bit signed value in bigendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint32 PHYSFS_swapSBE32(PHYSFS_sint32 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_uint32 PHYSFS_swapUBE32(PHYSFS_uint32 val)
 * \brief Swap bigendian unsigned 32 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 32-bit unsigned value in bigendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_uint32 PHYSFS_swapUBE32(PHYSFS_uint32 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_swapSBE64(PHYSFS_sint64 val)
 * \brief Swap bigendian signed 64 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 64-bit signed value in bigendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_sint64 PHYSFS_swapSBE64(PHYSFS_sint64 val);


/**
 * \fn PHYSFS_uint64 PHYSFS_swapUBE64(PHYSFS_uint64 val)
 * \brief Swap bigendian unsigned 64 to platform's native byte order.
 *
 * Take a 64-bit unsigned value in bigendian format and convert it to
 *  the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param val value to convert
 *   \return converted value.
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ PHYSFS_uint64 PHYSFS_swapUBE64(PHYSFS_uint64 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readSLE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert a signed 16-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read a signed 16-bit littleendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readSLE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readULE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert an unsigned 16-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read an unsigned 16-bit littleendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readULE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readSBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert a signed 16-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read a signed 16-bit bigendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readSBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readUBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert an unsigned 16-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read an unsigned 16-bit bigendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readUBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readSLE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert a signed 32-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read a signed 32-bit littleendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readSLE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readULE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert an unsigned 32-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read an unsigned 32-bit littleendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readULE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readSBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert a signed 32-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read a signed 32-bit bigendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readSBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readUBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert an unsigned 32-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read an unsigned 32-bit bigendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readUBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readSLE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert a signed 64-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read a signed 64-bit littleendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_sint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readSLE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readULE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert an unsigned 64-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read an unsigned 64-bit littleendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readULE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readSBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert a signed 64-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read a signed 64-bit bigendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_sint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readSBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_readUBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 *val)
 * \brief Read and convert an unsigned 64-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Read an unsigned 64-bit bigendian value from a
 *  file and convert it to the platform's native byte order.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle from which to read.
 *    \param val pointer to where value should be stored.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. If successful, (*val) will
 *           store the result. On failure, you can find out what went wrong
 *           from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_readUBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 *val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeSLE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 val)
 * \brief Convert and write a signed 16-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert a signed 16-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to littleendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeSLE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeULE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 val)
 * \brief Convert and write an unsigned 16-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert an unsigned 16-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to littleendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeULE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeSBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 val)
 * \brief Convert and write a signed 16-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert a signed 16-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to bigendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeSBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint16 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeUBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 val)
 * \brief Convert and write an unsigned 16-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert an unsigned 16-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to bigendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeUBE16(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint16 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeSLE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 val)
 * \brief Convert and write a signed 32-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert a signed 32-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to littleendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeSLE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeULE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 val)
 * \brief Convert and write an unsigned 32-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert an unsigned 32-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to littleendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeULE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeSBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 val)
 * \brief Convert and write a signed 32-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert a signed 32-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to bigendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeSBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint32 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeUBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 val)
 * \brief Convert and write an unsigned 32-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert an unsigned 32-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to bigendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeUBE32(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint32 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeSLE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 val)
 * \brief Convert and write a signed 64-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert a signed 64-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to littleendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeSLE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeULE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 val)
 * \brief Convert and write an unsigned 64-bit littleendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert an unsigned 64-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to littleendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeULE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeSBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 val)
 * \brief Convert and write a signed 64-bit bigending value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert a signed 64-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to bigendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeSBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_sint64 val);


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_writeUBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 val)
 * \brief Convert and write an unsigned 64-bit bigendian value.
 *
 * Convenience function. Convert an unsigned 64-bit value from the platform's
 *  native byte order to bigendian and write it to a file.
 *
 *    \param file PhysicsFS file handle to which to write.
 *    \param val Value to convert and write.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. On failure, you can
 *           find out what went wrong from PHYSFS_GetLastError().
 *
 * \warning Remember, PHYSFS_uint64 is only 32 bits on platforms without
 *          any sort of 64-bit support.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_writeUBE64(PHYSFS_file *file, PHYSFS_uint64 val);


/* Everything above this line is part of the PhysicsFS 1.0 API. */

/**
 * \struct PHYSFS_allocator
 * \brief PhysicsFS allocation function pointers.
 *
 * (This is for limited, hardcore use. If you don't immediately see a need
 *  for it, you can probably ignore this forever.)
 *
 * You create one of these structures for use with PHYSFS_setAllocator.
 *  Allocators are assumed to be reentrant by the caller; please mutex
 *  accordingly.
 *
 * \sa PHYSFS_setAllocator
 */
typedef struct
{
    int (*init)(void);
    void (*deinit)(void);
    void *(*malloc)(size_t);
    void *(*realloc)(void *, size_t);
    void (*free)(void *);
} PHYSFS_allocator;


/**
 * \fn int PHYSFS_setAllocator(PHYSFS_allocator *allocator)
 * \brief Hook your own allocation routines into PhysicsFS.
 *
 * (This is for limited, hardcore use. If you don't immediately see a need
 *  for it, you can probably ignore this forever.)
 *
 * By default, PhysicsFS will use ANSI C malloc/realloc/calloc/free calls
 *  to manage dynamic memory, but in some uncommon cases, the app might want
 *  more control over the library's memory management. This lets you redirect
 *  physfs to use your own allocation routines instead. You can only call this
 *  function before PHYSFS_init(); if the library is initialized, it'll
 *  reject your efforts to change the allocator mid-stream. You may call this
 *  function after PHYSFS_deinit() if you are willing to shutdown the library
 *  and restart it with a new allocator; this is a safe and supported
 *  operation. The allocator remains intact between deinit/init calls.
 *  If you want to return to the default allocator, pass a NULL in here.
 *
 * If you aren't immediately sure what to do with this function, you can
 *  safely ignore it altogether.
 *
 *    \param allocator Structure containing your allocator's entry points.
 *   \return zero on failure, non-zero on success. This call only fails
 *           when used between PHYSFS_init() and PHYSFS_deinit() calls.
 */
__EXPORT__ int PHYSFS_setAllocator(PHYSFS_allocator *allocator);


/* Everything above this line is part of the PhysicsFS 2.0 API. */


#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

#endif  /* !defined _INCLUDE_PHYSFS_H_ */

/* end of physfs.h ... */